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[13 Nov 2009]

During his address to the nation this week, Russian President Dmitry Medvedev proposed eliminating some of Russia’s eleven time zones. [More]

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[9 Nov 2009]

Grammy winner Whitney Houston will kick off her world tour with concerts in Moscow and St. Petersburg in December [More]

Culture and History »

[6 Nov 2009]

Russia and America have a long storied history together. [More]

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[4 Nov 2009]

Beauty can capture any beast, especially, if you are a hot Russian woman taking a bath. [More]

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[27 Oct 2009]

Yevgenia Lapova, a 23-year-old model from Novosibirsk, competed against 68 hot Russian women to take home the title of Miss Russian Beauty 2009. [More]

Culture and History »

[27 Oct 2009]

A controversial new Russian holiday was created only a few years ago in 2005. National Unity Day, also called People’s Unity Day, is celebrated on November 4th. There are several historical events surrounding this date, but some Russian citizens wonder about its true meaning and necessity, and choose to protest rather than celebrate.   It was in November of 1612 that Russian heroes Kuzma Minin and Dmitry Pozharsky led Russian troops to victory by evicting Polish invaders from Moscow and ending the Time of Troubles. During this period of Russian history, there was no tsar or patriarch to guide the people. The remarkable way that all classes of Russian society worked together and fought the invasion was the basis for the name of the holiday.   There is also another significance to the date of November 4th in Russian history. It was this day in the year 1721 that the St. Petersburg Senate voted to grant Peter the Great the status of “Father of the Nation and the Emperor”, effectively creating the Russian Empire.   This new holiday replaced a November 7th holiday known during the communist era as the Day of the Great October Socialist Revolution, which honored the 1917 Bolshevik revolution and which was renamed Accord and Reconciliation Day after the fall of the Soviet Union. Many communists boycott the new November 4th holiday and still demonstrate and protest on November 7th.   Since Unity Day is only a few years young, not many Russians fully celebrate it. A movie titled 1612 was made in 2007 to raise awareness about the new holiday and explain the history behind it. The film is based on the historical events but does feature fantasy elements such as unicorns. Despite the promotional efforts, the average Russian citizen still does not understand why this new holiday was created, although I’m sure they enjoy the day off from work.  

Random Stuff »

[13 Oct 2009]

The newest fitness trend is taking over gyms all over the world and Russia is no exception. The combination of athleticism, grace, flexibility and, yes, sex; pole dancing for fitness is way the many hot Russian women are staying trim and slim.   Burning up to 250 calories per hour, pole dancing has been proven to increase flexibility and core strength, improve posture and strengthen muscles. Supporting your entire body weight on a pole using just one arm is extremely difficult. Women who pole dance quickly show improved muscle definition in the arms, stomach, thighs and buttocks.   In its history, Russia has been the site of many competitions like the Olympic Games, The Champions League Final, UEFA matches, but none can match the outright sizzle of the Moscow Pole Dancing Contest.   To see some more delightful dishes check out the photo galleries at HotRussianBrides.com.

Sports and Politics »

[12 Oct 2009]

The director of Moscow’s city development plan has mentioned the possibility of constructing an underground “twin city” to help alleviate traffic problems in the Russian capital. Architect Sergey Tkachenko, who heads Moscow’s Genplan project for urban redevelopment, recently said that he and others involved in Genplan have been working on long-term plans to build the underground city. The city will feature underground roads, which will allow cars to pass through the city very quickly as well as alleviate traffic jams that currently plague Moscow. Tkachenko also said the underground city will be pedestrian-friendly. However, not everyone is enthusiastic about the idea. Some worry that the underground construction would be dangerous, given that Moscow sits at the junction of three geological platforms. It is thought that the building of underground tunnels could potentially trigger cave-ins and other destructive activity. Plans for the underground portion of Genplan are in the distant future. In the meantime, Moscow is constructing underground warehouses and parking lots. Source: http://newsfromrussia.com/russia/economics/01-10-2009/109618-moscow-0

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[8 Oct 2009]

It’s early morning in Moscow, which means men and women are baring all to have their photos taken in the city streets. As part of an exhibition at Moscow’s Garage Center of Contemporary Culture, renowned photographic artist Spencer Tunick enlisted the help of 10 of the city’s residents to create a series of nude artistic photographs dubbed “Moscow Individuals.” Known for his mass nude installation pieces – including having taken photos of 18,000 naked people in Mexico City and 7,000 in Barcelona – Tunick took a scaled down approach to his Moscow portraits. The 10 volunteers were photographed naked in various poses during the early morning hours at locations throughout the city, including in front of the Foreign Ministry. In an interview with the Moscow Times, Tunick confesses that he did not have permission from Moscow authorities to take the photographs, saying that obtaining permission would have been took difficult. Hence, the photos were taken during the early morning. He added that he would like to do a mass nude project in Moscow, similar to his previous installations, but a lack of funds for the project currently prohibits it. Tunick’s photos are currently on display as part of The Third Biennale of Contemporary Art, which runs through Oct. 25. Source: http://www.themoscowtimes.com/arts_n_ideas/article/384520.html  

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[7 Oct 2009]

Moscow families hoping to bury loved ones in a city cemetery face a nearly impossible task. According to a recent report in the Moscow Journal, only one of the city’s 71 cemeteries is open to new burials. This shortage of burial space leaves many grieving families with little options. By law, the Russian government must provide a free burial plot to its citizens. In response to the shortage of space, Moscow officials have started issuing burial plots far outside city limits, a practice that upsets many families. In some cases, family members are forced drive two or three hours just to visit a loved one’s grave. Although the Russian Orthodox Church frowns upon cremation, several families have chosen to cremate deceased family members rather than fight for burial space in an increasingly shrinking market. Because the demand for burial sites in Moscow is so high, corruption is rampant in the funeral industry with many undertakers taking advantage of desperate families. According to a 2006 documentary, one elderly widower was shocked to discover a new grave and a stranger’s tombstone at his wife’s burial plot.  Unless Moscow officials come up with a new plan, the numbers of families electing to cremate will continue to grow. As one grieving son told the Moscow Journal, “new plots are either far way, expensive, or both.”  

Culture and History »

[7 Oct 2009]

The Cathedral of the Assumption, located in Moscow’s Kremlin, has a long and intriguing history behind it. Being the oldest church in the city, this church has been built and rebuilt many times. Known as the protector of Russian Orthodoxy when first built in 1326, today’s church has five aesthetically pleasing domes to one’s eyes on the outside and just as pleasing decorative lime walls inside. This particular church replaced more ancient churches, one being made of wood and the other being made of stone. Again becoming worn down in the late 1400s, Ivan III demanded that a new church be built, which would be representative of Moscow’s new rank in the world as a place of power and strength.  The church is where the 1’st Russian Czar was crowned. Ivan the Terrible was also crowned here, as well as all of the emperors from 1721 onwards. In addition, kings and queens are buried on the church’s grounds, and Napoleon’s army housed his horses on the property in 1812. The church maintained a sense of dignity remaining undamaged by Bolshevik and White Troops as shots were fired between the two groups in 1917. The following year, the church was once again opened for Mass. The mass took place when the Bolshevik government came under the control of Moscow. Shortly afterwards the church was officially shut down under Lenin. However, it was up and running again in 1989. During this year, a mass was held to celebrate the Russian Patriarchate, which at that point had been intact for 300 years. This place of worship became even more popular in the 1990’s when a museum was added for the purpose of displaying the church’s clear and dynamic history. A must see place in Moscow, this church’s captivating beauty with a sense of historical significance is sure to have something for everyone to enjoy!